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that birth rights dramatically changed from the better and the provision is unique to the united states. this is a half hour. thanks to both of you for joining us. you will be talking about at this conference about birth right citizenship. set the stage for us in what is birth right citizenship. >> in a nut shell, this is the principal that any person born in the united states regardless of the status of their parents and theiran set offers and race and gender and religion and any other category is a citizen of the united states by virtue of being born here. you can become a citizen if you are an immigrant. the important point is this was not a principal that goes to the constitution. in the civil rights act of 1866. the first clause of the 14th amendment said any person born in the united states with or two minor exceptions were thought to be citizens of their own sovereignties, but any person born in the united states is a citizen. this was not necessarily the case of the civil war, the most dramatic example was dread scott in which the supreme court stated that no black person could
and that the provision is unique to the united states. this is half an hour. >>> american history tv is in milwaukee at the organization of american historians annual meeting and we're joined by professor eric foner from columbia university and linda kerber with the university of iowa. thanks to both of you for joining us. you'll be talking about at this conference about birthright citizenship and the 14th amendment. why don't you set the stage for us, mr. foner, and what is birthright citizenship? >> well, in a nutshell, this is the principle that any person born in the united states, regardless of the status of their parents, their ancestors, regardless of their race, gender, religion, any other category, is a citizen of the united states just by the virtue of being boerch here. of course you can also become a citizen by naturalization if you're an immigrant. but the important point is this was not a principle that goes all the way back to the institution constitution. it was really implemented or institutionalized in the aftermath of the civil war and the 14th amendment which wrote it into the co
to place it in a larger perspective, and that is by non-indians who want equality in the united states, wrapping themselves in the flag, and native peoples were here first, and survival, the fact that they have survived as separate cultures uniquely on the planet as american indians is, to me, the most noteworthy. they have not melded into the mainstream. by and large, tribes are still operating. some are in better shape than others, some are larger, some are smaller. some have suffered more, some have suffered slightly less, but they are still here, and if i wanted to change one thing, i would like the mainstream of america to realize that american indians, as tribes and tribal people, are still here, still a vibrant part of the economy, a part of the culture, a part of the arts, literature, music, this is, after all, oklahoma is, after all, an american indian state at its start, and american indians have not disappeared or vanished into the mainstream with dinosaurs, as some people are prone to ask me sometimes. >>> find out where skrchlt span's local content vehicles are going next
hamid karzai sits down for his only interview with me while in the united states. we talk about his personal relationship with president obama and even his personal relationship with mitt romney. stand by for that as well. >>> and the man sometimes nicknamed america's supermayor, has made a super gaffe. >>> i'm wolf blitzer in chicago. you're in the situation room. >>> but first, through my exclusive far reaching interview, i just completed only a few minutes ago with the afghan president hamid karzai, it's his only interview while here in the united states. we sat down only moments ago, and he spoke of president obama just minutes before the interview. the three leaders are here for a meeting in chicago. listen to this. >> no, we didn't have a three-way meeting, we had a three-way photograph taking. >> just a photo opportunity? >> why not a meeting? why not have a three-way meeting and discuss the most important issues facing afghanistan, pakistan and the united states. >> it wasn't for us to decide on the three-way meeting. the united states was the host and perhaps they saw it fi
women by double digits and be president of the united states. >> bill: what are the republicans thinking when, for example, like on the violence against women act or the lily led led better act and the federal leave act and all of these issues which do impact just the rights of women to be considered first class citizens i guess in this country. laura, what are they thinking? >> i don't know what they're thinking. a lot of their moves have not been very politically smart lately. but you see them like, for instance, with the violence against women act, republicans put forth a woman to introduce the act sandy adams from florida. she was actually a domestic violence victim. she didn't actually write the bill but they basically boehner chose her and said because you're a woman and you were abused, you're going to sponsor this and it is going to make us look less anti-woman here. we've got all of these republican women that are supporting it so how can it be a war on women. it is a war on democratic ideals. so i t
of death in latin america. does the scary parasitic disease pose a growing threat here in the united states? >>> and a runway emergency in chicago where a giant cargo jet collides with an airliner. we'll bring you the very latest. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." -- captions by vitac -- >>> president obama telephones mitt romney, congratulates him for going over the top in the republican delegate count and over the top comments with supporter donald trump has created a distraction. you've heard trump question the birthplace in "the situation room," now romney is trying to move on. here's our national political correspondent, jim acosta. >> wolf, mitt romney has left las vegas, but donald trump is refusing to leave the campaign stage. >> americans are tired of being tired. >> now that he's crunched the number of delegates to win the gop nomination, it's victory lap time for mitt romney. get the checkered flag this new romney campaign video is all about the stars and stripes. >> we're united by one great, overwh overwhelming passion. we love america. we believe
in latin america. many people are infected. what kind of threat does it pose in the united states? actually, the milk from my farm makes it so creamy, right dad. dad can see... boys! don't you think ouffer's steam perfect bag should get some credit? my carrots. my milk. [ female announcer ] new from stouffer's. farmers' harvest steam meals taste so good we'll bet the farm on it. oh, yeah? [ chris ] you can call us 24-7, get quotes online, start a claim with our smartphone app. you name it, we're here, anytime, anywhere, any way you want it. that's the way i need it. any way you want it. [ man ] all night? all night. every night? any way you want it. that's the way i need it. we just had ourselves a little journey moment there. yep. [ man ] saw 'em in '83 in fresno. place was crawling with chicks. i got to go. ♪ any way you want it ♪ that's the way you need it ♪ any way you want it ♪ ♪ any way you want it last season was the gulf's best tourism season in years. in florida we had more suntans... in alabama we had more beautiful blooms... in mississippi we had more good t
can win an academy award someday and the guy behind you can be a future president of the united states or even better than that the mayor of new york city the guy in front of you could be a future nobel laureate not to your right but certainly the one to your left. it's even worse than it looks in which they argue that washington partisanship has caused congress to become dysfunctional. we talked to the authors on wednesday washington journal. this is just under an hour. >> the gentleman that for a book are taking a look at congress it's even worse than that looks how the american constitutional system collided with the new politics of extremism. joining us, the author norman and co-author resident scholar of the american enterprise institute thomas mann of the brookings institution where he served studies senior fellow. gentlemen, thanks for joining us. >> happy to be with you. >> the question is if it is worse than it looks, what exactly is worse? >> guest: we are now in a situation which we have a fundamental mismatch between our political parties which would become intensely polari
built. thank you very much. we want to thank the lieutenant general and his staff with the united states of america vietnam memorial commemorative committee. the department of defense under the strong leadership of secretary of defense leon panetta has shown some really great leadership. they are making this day possible. this will be an amazing day that no one here ever forget. thank you for spending at memorial day with us. this ceremony will be unlike anything that has ever been hosted here before. this is indeed a special occasion for this memorial. i know that you will be moved and inspired. i want to be the first to invite everyone to come back for another wonderful event, veterans day as we commemorate the 30th anniversary of the vietnam veterans memorial. we will also gather across the street to break down for the education center at the wall. this is a place where heroes will be honored and the veterans of vietnam will be remembered and the veterans of iraq and afghanistan will be honored there. thank you very much to those of you who have served. i hope to see all of you in nov
the years the united states and other democratic countries have imposed sanctions on the burmese government to pressure for change. now that there seems to be some progress at what pace should those sanctions be lifted? how does the u.s. provide rewards for progress without losing he have arerage for further change? >> i understand from a news broadcast this morning that senator mccain is thinking of the suspension of sanctions rather than lifting of sanctions. it possible first step. what has been done at the e.u., what has been done by the e.u., they would suspend sanctions but not lift them all together. that is a way sending a strong message that we will help the process of democratization. if this is not maintained we will have this think of other ways of making sure that the aspirations of people of burma for democracy is respected. i am am not against the suspension of sanctions as long as the people of the united states feel this is the right thing to do at the moment. i do, i do have a caution though. i sometimes feel that things, people are too optimistic about the scene in burma.
to see the united states senate taking a more conservative track. >> even high school is not off limits. >> i did some stupid things in high school, and if i hurt anyone, i am sorry and apologize for it. >> lawmakers still at it. voters in europe trigger a political tsunami. >> money flows like water, and if the dam breaks some place, it could flood, even here in america. captioned by the national captioning institute >> vice president joe biden has acquired a reputation as a person afflicted with foot-in- mouth disease. on last sunday's "meet the press," he said that gay marriage is fine with him. >> i'm comfortable with the fact that man marrying men, women marrying women, are entitled to the same rights. >> that caused a major flat amid the chattering classes, and by midweek, in an interview with robin roberts, the president suggested joe biden had jumped the gun. >> he got out a little bit over his skis. >> the president says he had already made the decision to come out in favor of gay marriage before the democratic national convention in north carolina in septemb
for the absolute, full, and complete end of slavery. you know, every slave in the united states immediately. and the people who are very active in this movement are often devout protestants, blacks and whites, men and women, people from all parts of the united states. but we must always remember that this is a small number of people. this was never a mainstream movement. this was never a mass movement. and students from our perspective today -- you know, when we look back at this, we would say, well, of course slavery should end. of course slavery should be abolished. you know, all thinking adults today would agree on that. and slavery is illegal everywhere now. the last country to abolish slavery was actually saudi arab arabia, which abolished slavery in 1962. 1962, not 1862. so it's been a long, hard struggle. but slavery is illegal now everywhere. but to say these things in the 1830s and '40s and '50s took a lot of courage. this took a lot of guts. this is not mainstream opinion. this is going against mainstream opinion. these people are at the cutting edge of reform. these people are in
. >> the american empire is in decline and, yes, the united states remains the most powerful weaponized military system the earth has ever known. that is treacherous combination. no politician will say that the empire is declining and that the game is over. it's over. now what? >> someone from romney and someone from obama's past. >> he really thinks it is over. he you have to ask yourself why. the guy that wrote the book what he is saying, what he is saying let's the first of all remember nobody has any money, nobody is buying anything, nobody is going out and getting things in terms of expensive clothing. to me the most important thing for romney to do is not take the bait and talk about economic mobility. that is what people in america want. i realize i was born in wealth but if i worked really hard i could get there but i'm not going to get a job if they don't have any money. doesn't it look poorly on president obama with bill ayers? >> this is like a football game. on one side you 6 capitalism. on the other side you have socialism. the problem is barack obama is the referee. any time you go
boys quiet, i never imagined that i would be running for president of the united states. you just never know. [applause] but i also want to promise you, as you graduate from regent today and become an alumnus, he will never join a more defined are collect -- you will never join a more finer club. the dues were stiff, but the benefits are eternal, and will redound not only to you but the people you serve and minister to in the future but i want to congratulate you on one of the finest investment decisions you have ever made, and i don't just mean your new found her earning potential. your decision to come to regent was an act of sheer obedience. that's what it was for susan, and for me, too, the voice of almighty god could coming to reach into university was an excellent decision, it's like changing decision. my purpose today is to remind you that this day would not have occurred without the prayer and vision and work of countless generations who went before you. there would never have been a regent university, there never would have been this lovely, albeit hot ceremony today, without t
did. >> you think he failed. it sounds like. >> he has more jobs in china than united states. >> i don't think we made a mistake. when you create jobs overseas than you do here. >> talking about context. >> up next. did president obama say details about his love life. his memoir dreams. some of his ex-girlfriends are coming out of the woodwork. it's my turn to answer questions on facebook. send any questions that you have for me. we're going to take five great ones right after the show. i will post the answers about 6:30 eastern. keep an eye out for them. ♪ ♪ ♪f! ♪ ♪ ♪ >>> welcome back. according to politico. in barack obama auto biography he talks about his often new york girlfriend. she is a blend of characters. instead of old fresh fruit, it's an old flame. obama admitted as much in the book's first edition. this is like the obama eats dog story, a fact you would have known had you read his book. that there is real scoop. nobody read his book. the only person that read the book was bill ayers because that was admiring his work -- joke. that goes back to the vetting of ca
for the economy of the united states. i have been a supporter of the export-import bank since i arrived in congress in 1977. simply put, the ex-im bank supports the sales of american-made products overseas when private finances is not available. -- financing is not available. according to the ex-im bank's 2011 annual report, the bank supported $32.7 billion in exports last year, over 288,000 american jobs. many of these jobs are in the pacific northwest and in my congressional district. i ask unanimous consent to put -- and add additional information. the important point srk let's vote for this bill. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman from california. mr. miller: i'm pleased to yield one minute to the distinguish mad jort leader, the gentleman from virginia, mr. cantor. the chair: the gentleman from virginia is recognized for one minute. mr. cantor: i thank the speaker and i thank the gentleman from california. mr. speaker, i rise today to speak in favor of h.r. 2072, securing american jobs through export act of 2011. make no mistake, i am no fan of government sub
the massacre in houla friday. the united states signaled it would continue down the diplomatic path to end the bloodshed in syria. but right now the violence is expected to continue. bill: . there is a warning if diplomacy fails the wider region could be drawn into a bigger war. >> reporter: in israel there is a concern about what might happen next. susan rice was talking to the united nations saying if the larger diplomatic push fails, the wider region could be pulled into the conflict. the iranian government says if the united states or other countries intervene militarily in syria, israel will be attacked. there is a concern about israel and iran in terms of the nuclear issue. there is a lot of concern in the middle east about what happens next. right now it is a diplomatic push by the united states and the diplomatic community and the u.n. this seems to be the on real option anybody is considering. right now military intervention is off the table for most of the international community, bill. martha: with that violence escalating by the day, we are getting more images of the civilians
the challenges with less risk of damage to the economies of the rest of the world and the united states. >> if breeze is forced out of the euro before they get to this wonderful package of slower austerity and more growth? is forced out of the euro? >> europe as a whole has a very strong incentive in doing what it's gone to take to make monetary union work. that's what the reforms over the last six months have tried to do. they tried to put in place a set of mechanisms for discipline in fiscal policy and cooperating on fiscal policy, for sharing as of resources, for managing the financial system that need to make monetary union work. i think their decisions, confronted with this fear of broad erosion in your experiment, is to redouble their commitment to try to make this thing work. if we believe they have the ability to do that. we hope they manage this process. very difficult set of intelligence. >> to learn anything from their experience or is it totally different? >> the talent is are different, but if you listen to where we started this conversation, what we're trying to do is make
's a very good example of where germany could lead in the future and help the united states and the united kingdom to rebuild our badly weak bridges to the russian leadership as president putin takes power and we must do this because russia's just too important and russia is both in some ways an adversary, not in military terms, but politically, but in some ways it's a friend and partner of the united states. we want to accentuate the friendship and partnership. i think chanceler merkel is perfectly placed to be that bridge for the u.s. to russia. >> terry murphy. good day, sir. quick comment and a two-part question. comment number one is you kind of overlooked the trans-atlantic business dialogue which has been going on for 20 years quite prominently. but secondly on the question of germany, last week i think it was captain harry whales, junior officer of the british army, got an award from the beneficiary council for his efforts to support the wounded warriors of britain and we know that the wounded warriors here are supported by the populous. there was a piece in the paper that wounded
't dream. my mother believed and my father believed that if i wanted to be president of the united states, i could be. i could be vice president. my mother and father and believed that if my brother and sister wanted to be a millionaire, they could be a millionaire. my mother and father dreamed as much as any rich guy dreams. >> absolutely. >> any don't get it! they don't get who we are. >> good morning. it's thursday, may 17th. >> who was that? >> that was the vice president of the united states. >> i don't get it. >> what do you mean you don't get it? >> i don't get who they are. i'm joking. of course, i get who joe is. >> i get who joe is. >> i am joe. joe is me. >> yes, you are. >> all right. >> you're confused. >> i'm back we have. we have jim cramer on the set running into 30 rock this morning scurrying around in circles going where is the "wall street journal." he looked like he needed a fix. >> mike, you hung out with baseball on us last night. >> baseball owners and bob bowman and who we were talking about who created and developed mlb-tv, which is just spectacular. >> spectacula
. garamendi's district all the way across the united states to try to respond to that threat. they want somebody who will be there quicker and have the opportunity to respond. all are open-source intelligence -- all our open-source intelligence indicates that iran could have nuclear capability by 2015. i do not think anyone wants to gamble by saying that our adverse eight years -- our adversaries are going to be so slow that we can just wait. we cannot wait. this has a rolling time period in which to get done. you cannot just flick a s witch. we know there is a secret deal with the russians were the president believes he will have greater flexibility after the election -- where the president believes he will have greater flexibility after the election. i think most of us on the committee, a majority, believe that we should not be responding to a secret deal with the russians, but responding to the real needs that we have for national security. we need to do missile defense whether this president wants to or not. when you look at the emerging threats, the open source intelligence, it oft
on one thing. when you leave the east coast of the united states, you can drive for miles from state to state and not see another black face. call to montana, utah, parts of oregon and washington -- there are lots of african americans in this country but there are parts where there are none. on the broader issue, that is certainly true. the president has done a lot for not just african americans but for everyone in the country. the health-care bill, the stimulus package. we were losing 800,000 jobs a month. the shift has been helpful for everyone. you cannot count on the all.dent to do with allit you have to start a small business and take the risk of willing to fail. there are conditions that exist, but government cannot solve all those problems. they have to be solved at the committee level. host: teresa is a republican from trenton, new jersey. caller: hi. i was listening -- i really love you. you're a great democratic strategist and i love your opinions and have you correct other people and bring them back to what the heart of the problem is. thank you for that. in order for us t
in the southwest united states, where cities that were, if you take certain cities on the edge of california, on their edge of los angeles, for example, that were -- had a conventional post war democratic and have now become 90 to 95% hispanic, this is a democratic that wasn't even in the 1960 u.s. census. that's actually a big transformation in a fairly short space of time. and it has consequences. now, when you put the why, i would do you care, that's the benign view. people think -- we were talking about broadway just we went on air. that's like the production of holiday pel low doll -- "hello dolly" and then he ran out of brassy, middle-aged blonds, and then he changed it to an all-black cast, and people think that's what happened if you have a muslim netherlands or muslim britain, there will be fewer pubs, the pubs will have to close, but essentially it will basically still be the same, and i don't think that's -- no serious person would argue that. >> host: on the cover of the new paperback version of "america alone" there's a little sticker, soon to be banned in canada. >> guest: that
on the birth of the united states." professor wood is interviewed by national review's senior editor richard brookhiser. the new york historical society hosted this hour-long event. for coming out on this grim night. but you had a great incentive which is to hear gordon wood. i'm going to begin by paying you, gordon, a round-about compliment. it's a little late, but a nice one. i had dinner with newt gingrich in 1994. and he had -- he had just become speaker elect. the republicans had just captured the house in the '94 election for the first time in 40 years. and at the dinner he talked -- the talk turned to what i was doing. i knew what he was doing. i said i was writing a book on george washington. and without hesitation, he said you have to read "the radicalism of the american revolution" by gordon wood. so we all have our opinions on newt and sometimes he's with the public and sometimes he's not, but there he was entirely with the public. this is -- this is a provocative, interesting, delightful book so i want to get right to it. i want to start with my favorite sentence. my favorite sen
to the united states. why some cuban-americans are furious. we're going in-depth. >>> first the secret service and now dea agents are under investigation for allegedly hiring prostitutes in colombia. i'm wolf blitzer. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." -- captions by vitac -- >> the high-powered campaign surrogate is on the hot seat for going off message after newark's democratic mayor cory booker spoke about the attacks on mitt romney's old firm bane capital. he had to struggle to do damage control and the dust still hasn't settled. let's discuss what's going on with the key adviser of the romney campaign, ed gillespie, former republican of the national committee. thanks very much for coming in. >> thank you for having me, wolf. good to be with you. >> let's talk about what the president specifically said about mitt romney, his experience at bane capital yesterday and then we'll get your reaction. >> my opponent, governor romney, his main calling card for why he thinks he should be president is his business expense. he's not there touting his experience in massach
, from all over the united states. not just from states with big slave populations, which is what we might expect, but even in free states. in states where slavery had been abolished during a revolution or soon after the revolution there was still a lot of criticism. and we must remember that the past is different from the present. we must remember that the whole spectrum of political opinion is completely different from what it is today. many of the presidents are themselves slave owners. and the president of the united states in the 1830s was a very wealthy slave owner, andrew jackson. we talked about that in an earlier lecture. and jackson denounced abolitionists. he said they were dangerous, they were incendiaries, they were trying to harm the united states, they were trying to harm american society. so this is something that is a hard fight for abolitionists in this generation. and the 19th century has been called by historians the century of emancipation because this fight takes place in many different societies. and it's a hard fight everywhere. and everywhere slave owners fig
to be guilty of plotting against the united states. but it should arouse your attention. it should arouse your concern if you are an american and your fellow citizen can be picked up in the united states and held without being charged with anything for two and a half years. when i wrote up a book proposal about him, nobody wanted to print it because it was a downer, as one publisher said. now, yes, that's one of the reasons why it would be a good book, frankly. it's a downer. it's a downer that it could happen. it's a downer that it did happen. it's a downer that jose padilla because he was a puerto rican gang banger and not the head of the local lion's club or rotary can be stuck away in a prison without anybody giving a damn whether he's even there or whether he's ever been tried. it should be something of tremendous concern to us all. i have to say again, i'm not sticking up for the guy. if he's guilty of anything, then, fine, let the legal system work and find him guilty and put him away for as long as the charges he's charged with merit his detention. but americans should not be arrested
of enfranchising women, the united states is in the middle of the pack, you know, behind new zealand, 1893, the first western style democracy to enfranchise women, behind australia, behind great britain, ahead of portugal, 1976, ahead of kuwait, 2006. so the u.s. is sort of in the middle of the pack. and if elizabeth cady stanton had then told in 1888 that the female suffrage was something that was going to happen decades into the future i think she would have been disbelieving. she had a lot of confidence as did many other reformers that this was the right thing to do. it's interesting, however, that stanton doesn't mention the fact that women had already voted in a part of the united states. we talked about that in an earlier lecture. does any one remember where they used to vote? yeah, new jersey. they voted in new jersey for about a generation from the 1770s to the early 1800s then were disenfranchised, i think i mentioned this. they were disenfranchised because a member of the new jersey state legislature had lost a race earlier and he blamed it on women voters for some reason. it was
, and it was the right thing to do. >> the president of the united states today chose an interview with robin roberts to make news and to make history. >> over the course of several years as i talked to friends and family and neighbors, when i think about members of my own staff who are incredibly committed, monogamous relationships, same-sex relationships, raising kids together, when i think about those soldiers or airmen or marines or sailors who are out there fighting on my behalf, and yet feel constrainted, even now that don't ask, don't tell is gone, because they are not able to commit themselves in a marriage, at a certain point i just concluded that for me personally, it is important for me to go ahead and affirm that i think same-sex couples should be able to get married. >> white house officials are leaking a background story that sounds like the stuff of fiction and just may be. as the story goes, the president planned to announce his support for marriage equality sometime before the democratic national convention in september, but then vice president biden said this on "meet the press." >>
of the united states obviously in a dramatic fashion in this interview wanted to clarify once and for all that his position has evolved. he supports same-sex marriage and he's making that clear right now. >> we now have the video. let's just roll it. >> i have been going through an evolution on this issue. i have always been adamant that gay and lesbian americans should be treated fairly and equally. and that's why in addition to everything we've done in this administration, rolling back don't ask don't tell so that outstaptding americans can defend our country. i've stood on the side of is broader equality for the lgbt community. and i hesitated on gay marriage in part because i thought civil unions would be sufficient, that that was something that would give people hospital visitation rights and other elements that we take for granted. and i was sensitive to the fact that for a lot of people, you know, the word marriage was something that evokes very powerful traditions, religious beliefs and so forth. but i have to tell you that over the course of several years, as i talk to friends an
studies supported medical use of marijuana for treatment in the united states and no animal or human data supports the safety of marijuana for general medical use, end of quote. as required by the controlled substance act, the d.e.a. required a scientific and medical valuation and scheduling recommendation. and i quote, that marijuana, the stuff we are saying tonight -- anybody -- and you saw the "60-minute" piece, they come in, buy, they take. we are talking about doctors, the number of doctors ripping off people with objectiony continuin. the number of -- oxycotin. and go down to broward county in florida and go into the pain clinics. there are buses and planes coming down to buy it and doctors are writing prescriptions. so we are going to hide behind it? the number of doctors that ruin young people on oxycotin whereby they died, they died, the doctor says it's ok, but health and human services said, quote, marijuana has a high potential for abuse. has no accepted no medical use in the united states and lacks an acceptable level of safety. i think if this amendment passes and this becom
of the united states thinks this is an important thing and he wanted to affirm it. then on top of that, if we ever have something go to the supreme court, i think it will be very important what the highest office holder in our land thinks about same-sex marriage as well as the polling, as well as how many states have legalized it. we like to pretend that the supreme court lives in a bubble but they do not. those justices live among us. >> woodruff: kerry eleveld, thank you very much. >> thank you. we get two views now on the president's announcement and its significance. evan wolfson is the president and founder of freedom to marry, a leading organization seeking to legalize same-sex marriage in states around the country. and the reverend harry jackson is senior pastor of hope christian church in beltsville, maryland, presiding bishop of the international communion of evangelical churches, and an outspoken opponent of gay marriage. reverend jackson, what does it mean to you what the president said? >> well, i believe he's been dealing with this for a long time and the motivation was to ramp u
not understand why some people think that russia is the no. 1 adversary of the united states, we need russia and afghanistan. russia is helping us to resupply our forces in afghanistan. we have an interest in promoting counter-terrorism cooperation in russia. i was thinking that iran, right now the no. 1 national security issue of the united states is the iranian nuclear future. if you look at that constructs, russia is the most important country at the table for the united states. china will not be helpful. the european powers, of course, have a limited influence. if there is going to be an endgame on iran, where we convince them not to start -- not to stop short, they will have a lot to do with that solution. there will be a very close u.s.- russian interplay and cooperation on iran. meaning that the nato russian relationship is critically important. the promise of 10 years ago when we created the summit in italy, that promise has not been fulfilled. i would think a major order of business for the u.s. and germany is to bring back a good working relationship with the russian government. ve
. >> the president of the united states and the former governor of massachusetts. ed gillespie, thanks for coming in. >> thank you for having me, wolf. >> toxic chemicals and the risks they pose to children. >> when you sit down you release this fine spray of toxic chemicals right in the face of your baby. that isn't right. >> the so-called stroller brigade pushes their babies and pushes lawmakers for more regulation and it is too late for democrats to put hillary clinton on the ticket. paul begala and eric ericsson are both standing by live. why some cuban-americans are so angry about this week's visit. [ banker ] mike and brenda found a house that they really wanted. it was in my sister's neighborhood. i told you it was perfect for you guys. literally across the street from her sister. [ banker ] but someone else bought it before they could get their offer together. we really missed a great opportunity -- dodged a bullet there. [ banker ] so we talked to them about the wells fargo priority buyer preapproval. it lets people know that you are a serious buyer because you've been credit-approved. we g
as appropriate leaders of the united states. >> you don't think there was anything interesting in talking about the constitution saying the age of the president and the birth place of the president and the citizenship of of the president, the long run-up to something about business which the romney campaign consistently says is their focus. margaret hoover come on. >> you said will cain and didn't get the answer you like. >> it's not the answer i like. i think you're not being honest with me. >> excuse me, when i'm accused of being dishonest you can be assured i will respond. >> good, you go. >> i think this is the unfortunate happenstance of including donald trump in your news coverage. we expand the narrative to assume that everything mitt romney says when he's speaking on the value of business experience that -- >> run that clip again. >> no, you can play it as soon as i'm done but let me finish this. >> i'm not saying every little thing. i'm saying this particular clip where he talks about changing the constitution because the age, the birth place, the citizenship and then goes on and talks
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